Pentagon tests first land-based cruise missile after pulling out of INF Treaty

The Pentagon conducted a test of a land-based cruise missile on Sunday, the first such test since the U.S. pulled out of the Intermediate-Vary Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty earlier this month.

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“On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 2:30 p.m. Pacific Sunlight hours Time, the Division of Defense conducted a flight test of a conventionally-configured ground-launched cruise missile at San Nicolas Island, California,” the Pentagon acknowledged in an announcement on Monday. “The test missile exited its ground cell launcher and accurately impacted its target after better than 500 kilometers of flight.”

A U.S. legitimate acknowledged the missile modified into once a variant of a Tomahawk Land Attack Missile, designed to prefer a ragged, no longer nuclear, payload.

“Recordsdata tranquil and classes learned from this test will assert the Division of Defense’s pattern of future intermediate-vary capabilities,” the Pentagon acknowledged.

PHOTO: On Aug. 18, at 2:30 p.m. the Defense Division conducted a flight test of a conventionally configured ground-launched cruise missile at San Nicolas Island, Calif.Scott Howe/Defense.gov
On Aug. 18, at 2:30 p.m. the Defense Division conducted a flight test of a conventionally configured ground-launched cruise missile at San Nicolas Island, Calif.

The U.S. formally withdrew from the INF Treaty on Aug. 2 after the Trump administration declared Russia had long been in cloth breach of the Cool War hands-administration pact. While analysts have warned that the treaty’s finish would possibly perhaps well lead to a harmful new hands fade, senior administration officials argued the U.S. had no different but to finish a deal that most good one aspect modified into once abiding by.

The Pentagon began compare and pattern efforts thinking about cell, ragged and ground-launched cruise and ballistic missile systems in 2017 that it described as being within the “early phases” as a result of The US’s compliance with the INF Treaty.

“Now that we have withdrawn, the Division of Defense will fully pursue the pattern of these ground-launched ragged missiles as a prudent response to Russia’s actions and as fragment of the Joint Force’s broader portfolio of ragged strike solutions,” Defense Secretary Fee Esper acknowledged in an announcement on Aug. 2.

Esper told journalists earlier this month that these weapons would be based in Asia but acknowledged the categorical do requires further discussions with allies within the arena.

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